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Customer Stories

Purdue University Creates a Foundation for e-Learning Success

Challenge Adapting To A New Way Of Learning Purdue University is a public research university located in West Lafayette, Indiana and is consistently ranked as one of the best public...

More than 1,000 organizations in over 40 countries around the world rely on D2L to help them transform learning.

Gwinnett County Public Schools – Success with district-wide digital learning initiative

In a recent survey by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, 93% of teachers responded that they now use some type of digital technology to teach. Teachers are increasingly experimenting with digital technologies as a way to enable learning strategies, such as adaptive learning, and are engaging with students online to assign web-based projects, provide feedback, and offer interventions. Gwinnett County Public Schools is a school district operating in Gwinnett County, Georgia. The largest school district in Georgia, with 134 schools serving more than 176,000 students, Gwinnett County Public Schools embarked several years ago on an ambitious digital learning initiative to transform instruction and learning inside and outside of its classrooms through blended learning.

Valdosta State University- Using Brightspace to implement a unique CBE experience

In November 2009, President Obama launched the Educate to Innovate initiative to move American students from the middle to the top of the pack in science and math achievement over the next decade. Recognizing that great teaching is part of any child’s success, President Obama also issued a challenge to the nation to recruit and prepare more than 100,000 new teachers over the next decade.

Stephen F. Austin State University- Five-star accommodation

It had always been a point of pride—Stephen F. Austin State University (SFASU) enjoyed a reputation for offering the most in accessibility. When it came to online learning, however, feedback was less than glowing. Students and faculty who needed accommodations, particularly the visually impaired, were regularly calling for help. Unfortunately, the learning management system (LMS) used by SFASU made it impossible to resolve the recurring issues. Determined to reverse the situation, they set out to find a learning platform that would meet their accessibility requirements. In order to get it right, they asked for help from those who would benefit the most: students and faculty.

Babcock & Wilcox Canada Ltd.- Enabling Employees to Meet Industry Compliance Standards

Founded in 1844, Babcock & Wilcox Canada Ltd. (B&W Canada) is a world leader in the engineering, manufacturing, service and, construction of steam generation and associated equipment for utilities and industrial applications. More specifically, the company offers design, engineering, manufacturing, construction, and services to nuclear, thermal power, and industrial clients around the world. Headquartered in Cambridge, Ontario, B&W Canada employs approximately 800 employees across Canada.

Fanshawe College – To set itself apart, a community college creates a different kind of MOOC

Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are valued for their ability to reach an international audience through the web and blend traditional educational tools, such as videos, with open forums for discussion to create rich academic communities. As of early 2013, the only MOOCs offered in Canada were typically at the university level. They were theory-based and led by academics. Could a community college compete? Fanshawe College in London, Ontario, wanted to be the first to find out.

Hamilton Wentworth District School Board – A flexible learning platform gives all students access to enriched resources

The only downside of teachers at the Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board (HWDSB) loving their new Web 2.0 tools was that they loved a very wide variety of them. They all had different usernames, passwords, and URLs. While the Board used a standardized blogging platform built in-house, they were also branching out in different areas to use different Learning Management System (LMS) tools. That meant they were unable to support one another and, since they were being hosted in a variety of spaces, it was next to impossible for the Board to provide guidance.