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DevLearn 2018: Learning and Development Trends Recap

  • 1 Min Read

Data, competency and skill measurement, and social learning were key themes at DevLearn 2018.

The past two days at #DevLearn have seen some incredible conversations, stories, and collaboration with hundreds of amazing people looking to continually improve their learning and development (L&D) strategies. The D2L booth was filled with lively conversations about social learning, engaging learners, and producing meaningful learning experiences.

Here are some of the main topics discussed throughout the week.

Attendees asked questions such as, how can we be better at measuring learning? How can we curate content in L&D?


Julie Snyder, the co-creator and executive producer of popular podcasts Serial and S-Town, reminded attendees during her day one keynote that being open to experimentation means being open to failure.


Bite-sized learning was another hot topic, where attendees were able to discuss how providing brief and specific snippets of learning can help you keep content top of mind.


Attendees were also reminded that it is what is done with the training after it is received that is the most important and impactful.


And, in her concluding keynote on day one, educator, research, and innovator Ayanna Howard quoted Richard Riley, Secretary of Education under President Bill Clinton, who addressed how the future of work is unclear in that students need to be prepared for jobs that do not yet exist today, using tech that has not been created to solve the problems that we are unaware of.


With another successful DevLearn wrapping up, it’s clear that L&D pros have preparing employees for the future of work firmly in mind. To effectively prepare your employees, find out why your organization should make the move to modern learning.

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